Best Memphis Music for 2012

 

Our Music manager, Cheri Carr, has graciously provided us with a list of the best Memphis Music for 2012.  Please come in and check out these titles.  A sterling collection, Dr. Carr!

 

Luther Dickinson’s Hambone’s Meditations

Grammy-nominated and hauntingly beautiful folk guitar, Hambone’s Meditations was recorded just days after the death of Dickinson’s much-loved father. Though it’s a purely instrumental album, its emotional range is Shakespearean.

 

Fast Planet’s Jes

With Jes, Fast Planet broke the “Memphis” music mold with their combination of sweeping melodies, danceable beats, and vocals so slow-burning they’ll make caramel of you. This is poignant ambient pop and hands-down the most delightful surprise of the year.

 

River City Tanline’s Coast to Coast

Catchy, no-frills pop rock is what the River City Tanlines do. And on Coast to Coast, they do it better than any other album this year. Alicja Trout’s sweet vocals balance the punked out up-tempo drumming for an experience that is pure Memphis and pure fun.

 

Lucero’s Women & Work

More symphonically layered and slickly produced than their previous albums, Lucero’s Women & Work manages to marry the moody folk-punk Americana sound Lucero is known for with some joyful and very Stax-sounding horns and keys. On everyone’s “Best Of” list this year for a reason.

 

South Memphis String Band: Old Times There

As the South Memphis String Band, all-star trio Luther Dickinson, Alvin Youngblood Hart and Jimbo Mathus render some of the more disquieting of the forgotten folk songs of yester-year with a thought-provoking tenderness. In combination with heir originals it’s an album at turns humorous, self-effacing, and brave.

 

Deering & Down’s Somewhere Out There

Neil Down’s gritty blues guitar is the perfect balance for Lahna Deering’s sweet choir soprano.  Recorded at Memphis Royal Recording Studio, with horn arrangements from legendary producer Willie Mitchell, this album sounds exactly like summer in Memphis: fun, unhurried, and hot.

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